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3 minutes
February 11, 2017

Beginning To Learn The Dramatica Theory Of Story

Appreciating the difference between the subjective and objective view of characters improves narrative structure 10,000%.

Dramatica tends to confuse writers new to the theory’s concepts. While many connect to it in ways they never did with other paradigms, certain story points require further explanation. Witness this email from a writer who recently discovered this wonderfully complex theory of narrative:

Hi, Jim. I’m all new to Dramatica and writing stuff and I have a very basic question about Main Characters. If the MC perspective is to be the audience experience of the story, how to tell facts that the MC doesn’t have seen ? How to show these facts to the audience? Sorry if it is a too stupid question, but as I said I am a newbie to writing and to Dramatica.

When it comes to Dramatica there is no such thing as a stupid question, especially in the beginning. The question you ask is a common one, but easily explained. In a complete story there are four perspectives:

You need all four to accurately depict the conflict in a story, otherwise your Audience will think you’re putting one over on them. It’s like focusing on only one side of the story, and not giving the other side a chance to voice their concerns.

So in answer to your question you absolutely have to show the Audience information the Main Character isn’t personally privy to so that they can see for themselves the difference between what the Main Character sees and what everyone else sees in the Overall Story. You don’t simply lock yourself away within the Main Character; if you do, you end up making it impossible to accurately depict that Overall—or objective—perspective on things. Moonlight gets away with this, but that’s because it’s Moonlight. Not many stories can claim that much artistry.

That differential contains the key to greater understanding of the problems in our lives. It is the reason why we love stories so much. In our own lives we can’t simultaneously be within ourselves and without ourselves; but stories can. And that’s why we keep going back to them over and over again.

So absolutely, show all the things your Main Character doesn’t know about. And then show some things only the Main Character knows. Your Audience will love you for it…especially if both sides are connected thematically through a strong storyform.

Never trust a Hero.

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