The Manual

Videocasts

A series of videos introducing the key features of Subtext.

1. Introduction to Stories

In this first episode, we cover the way Subtext organizes stories and structures.

Subtext allows you to not only maintain several stories, but also multiple narratives within each story. This reflects the reality of many projects that seek to explore different Narrative Arguments. The Empire Strikes Back, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and Jerry Maguire are great examples of stories with more than one narrative structure.

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2. The Structure Builder

In this episode, we take our first look at Subtext's powerful Structure Builder feature.

Based on the Narrative Argument chosen in the previous video, Subtext quickly builds out a template of narrative Storybeats. The order in which these beats appear determines and defines the message locked within the Narrative Argument.

Storybeats must stay within their Structural Act in order to maintain the effectiveness of the message. That said, the order of beats within a Structural Act is open to the writer's intuition.

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3. Building Storybeats

In this episode, we explore Subtext's unique ability to bridge the gap between structure and storytelling.

The Storybeats in each Structural Act find their essence comprised of Storypoints locked within the Storyform. A Main Character Signpost 1 of Conscious must reflect an emotional beat based on consideration or attention. An Objective Story Signpost 1 of Conceptualizing finds the characters in the story coming into conflict over scheming or devising plans against each other.

The particular instance of each Storybeat can shift--as long as that essence of the original Storypoint remains intact.

Subtext offers tools for writers to quickly and effortlessly brainstorm new instances of Storypoints--directly from within the Structure Builder. By working with the Storypoints window, the Author makes the important transition from narrative structure to narrative storytelling.

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4. Uploading a Storyform from Dramatica

In this episode, we cover the process of importing a storyform from Dramatica.

While Subtext's extensive catalog of storyforms covers a wide range of Narrative Arguments, there will be times when you need greater precision in selecting your story's unique set of Storypoints.

Subtext makes it possible for you to export just the right storyform from the Dramatica application and import it directly into your story.

Subtext will even clean up your storyform and convert it to the far more accurate original terminology found in the first version of Dramatica.

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5. Storyform Connections

Seek out and explore strange new worlds of story structure with Subtext's comprehensive Storyform Connections feature.

Know the basic Storypoints you want to hit, but aren't sure about the specifics? Filter through hundreds of unique story structures in Subtext to find just the kind of story you want to start writing.

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6. The Conflict Builder

In this episode, we take a look at Subtext's fourth and final method for quickly identifying the narrative structure of your story.

If you have a vague or general sense of the kind of conflict you want to explore, use Subtext's Conflict Builder. Once you enter what you want to write about, Subtext scans its database find those Narrative Arguments that sync up with your intentions.

Simply choose the Narrative Argument that connects with you, and Subtext responds with a full narrative structure from which you can start developing your next story.

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7: Downloading a Screenplay Template in Fountain

If you're a screenwriter, download your narrative structure in the Fountain template provided by Subtext.

When you're ready to start writing, Subtext offers several different methods for exporting your narrative structure. The Fountain format is perfect for writing screenplays as it forces you to focus on the content of your story.

Simply tap the button marked Fountain at the bottom of your treatment, and open the file Subtext provides in your favorite editor.

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8: Downloading a Structure Template in Markdown

If you're a novelist or writing a treatment, download your narrative structure in the Markdown template provided by Subtext.

When you're ready to start writing, Subtext offers several different methods for exporting your narrative structure. The Markdown format is perfect for writing novels or screenplays as it forces you to focus on the content of your story.

Simply tap the button marked Markdown at the bottom of your treatment, and open the file Subtext provides in your favorite editor.

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