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              Jane Eyre

              A satisfying & enriching narrative that explores what it means to obligate oneself to another.

              Complete Story

              Surprisingly compelling story of a woman who finally follows her heart, transforming herself and finding the love she has always longed for (Main Character Resolve of Changed, Story Outcome of Success, and Story Judgment of Good). The story locks in once Influence Character Rochester—a grumpy man and a force of nature (Influence Character Throughline of Mind)—hires the governess to watch over his daughter.

              The story vibrates around the pain people encounter doing what they believe they are supposed to do (Overall Story Issue of Obligation), made evident in the decision to send Jane away and the decision for her to leave dear Rochester (Story Driver of Decision). Her preference for taking action first (Main Character Approach of Do-er)—hitting the schoolteacher back and attacking her brother—narrows down the places she can actually go and live her life (Story Limit of Optionlock).

              While Jane’s focus on maintaining balance within the relationships around her makes it difficult for Male audience members to fully relate with her plight (Main Character Problem-Solving Style of Holistic), doing what is sensible and manipulating oneself for society does not (Overall Story Throughline of Psychology and Overall Story Problem of Logic).

              While the Overall Story may add to the difficulty in attracting a Male audience, the choices she makes (Main Character Issue of Choice), Rochester’s unrealistic notions (Influence Character Issue of Dream) and the battle over whether or not she is a possession (Relationship Story Concern of Obtaining) strengthens the structure and maintains interest.

              All in all, a wonderfully complete story worthy of study.

              Never Trust a Hero

              Subscribe and receive our FREE PDF E-book on why the concept of a "Hero" in story is outdated and holding you back from writing a great story.